Davis-Monthan US Air Force Base gains recognition for achievements

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A US Air Force A-10C Thunderbolt II performs aerial manoeuvres during the annual Heritage Flight Training and Certification Course at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base

The Office of the Secretary of Defense has named Davis-Monthan Air Force Base the top base in the Air Force for the second time in six years. The base won the 2018 Commander-in-Chief's Installation Excellence Award, which recognizes the outstanding and innovative efforts of the service members who operate and maintain US military installations.

Davis-Monthan last won the award in 2012. Installations from across the Air Force competed for the award based on how well they achieve departmental objectives in several areas of installation management, including mission support, energy conservation, quality of life and unit morale, environmental stewardship, real property management, safety, health and security, communications and public relations.

"This trophy recognizes 11,000 (Davis-Monthan) Airmen who think, innovate and execute at an extraordinary level every day," said Col. Scott Campbell, 355th Fighter Wing commander. Davis-Monthan AFB is comprised of 34 unique mission partners that support four combatant commanders worldwide. Some of these operations include close-air support, combat search and rescue, airborne electronic combat, weather operations, and aircraft storage and regeneration.

“It wasn’t the chiefs and commanders who won this award, it was the Airmen,” Campbell said. “This is all thanks to them.”

 

 

US Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Frankie D. Moore

 

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