Airbus to expand Japan facility

Share/Save
The existing facility at Kobe Airport. Credit: Airbus

Airbus has announced plans to add a maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO) complex next to its facility at Kobe Airport Facility in Japan.

The company’s existing facility at the airport can accommodate 25 medium-sized helicopters at one time, but it hopes that the expansion will allow it to hold around 40 medium-sized helicopters. The existing facility houses a regional engineering hub and the country’s first and only helicopter full motion full-flight simulator, and Airbus is planning to add a state-of-the-art hangar, an administration office, and a purpose-built warehouse. The facility has trained over 500 pilots and engineers across the region.

“Japan is an important market for Airbus Helicopters. This additional facility is part of our growth plan in the country and demonstrates our commitment to strengthening our support for our customers’ fleets while responding to their increasing demand for aftersale support services,” said Olivier Tillier, Managing Director of Airbus Helicopters Japan.

The new facility will occupy a total space of 19,685 square meters, making it the largest in the aviation business sector at Kobe Airport. Since its first delivery in 1961, Airbus has delivered over 440 helicopters to operators in Japan.

“We have been building up our capabilities in Kobe over the years and believe the site offers a lot of growth potential,” added Tillier. “With a larger capacity, we will be able to offer our complete suite of support and services to our customers, spanning after-sales customer support, MRO, engineering, technical support, simulator training and warehousing.”

Other news

FLIR Systems, Inc. has announced that it has been awarded a contract by the French Defense Procurement Agency.

Eastnor Castle in Ledbury, UK, has announced that its Charity of the Year 2019 will be the Midlands Air Ambulance.

Devon Air Ambulance has announced that, with immediate effect, its emergency service will fly until 02:00 hrs every day of the week.

The Norwegian Accident Investigation Board identified a combination of human and organisation faults as factors in the November 2017 incident

The course, taught by Dr Dudley Crosson, will focus on the latest research and developments