SOF medical element strengthen capabilities in exercises

Share/Save
Staff Sgt. Andrew Thompson, 27th Special Operations Support Squadron SOF medical element, participates in a joint exercise with 27th Special Operations Civil Engineer Squadron firefighters at Cannon Air Force Base. © US Air Force photo by Senior Airman Lane T. Plummer

US Air Force Special Operations Forces Medical Element (SOFME) members have been taking part participated in exercises designed to test SOFME capabilities in providing medical aid to simulated casualties under stressful conditions. “No one ever wants to see another military member injured but unfortunately the best training comes from firsthand experience in the field,” said Tech. Sgt. Seth Haas, 27th Special Operations Support Squadron NCO-in-charge of critical operations. “We are creating the most realistic situations possible to better prepare our teams for deployments.”

Over the course of two weeks, according to Haas, SOFME teams and units around the base co-operated in completing rigorous scenarios simulating an austere medical site downrange, where they worked out of tents and forward deployed to pick up casualties. Treatment was given whilst on aircraft, on-the-ground and in vehicles to help simulate holding and caring for patients for an extended period of time. “This model will help our medics prepare for places where medical support is not as robust,” Haas said.

SOFME members are highly-skilled individuals that maintain their edge by conducting continual in-house training and treating patients in the 27th Special Operations Medical Group, according to Haas. They stay ready for sudden deployments in case of natural disasters or Special Operations Command tasks. In between times outside base, they’re here, training Airmen in basic life support and tactical combat casualty care courses prior to deployments.

The exercises were also used to help shed some light on what his career field is about, according to Haas. “The SOFME community is extremely small and a lot of leaders we come in contact with aren’t fully aware of what we bring to the fight,” Haas said. “While this training is something SOFMEs participate in regularly, it might be something a non-operational medic may never experience in their career. As an advocate for grooming the next generation of SOF medics, I will meet with medics that work in the hospital and recommend them to be involved with SOFMEs in any way possible. This exposure will help our younger medics to be aware of other career paths available to them and continue pushing the SOFME career field in the right direction.”

 

Other news

With the delivery of the first two AW139 intermediate twin engine helicopters, Leonardo and the Italian National Fire Corps (Vigili del Fuoco, part of the Ministry of the...

Air ambulance operator Fox Flight has announced the arrival of two Learjet 40-XR aircraft, which have joined the organisation’s fleet of aeromedical jets and are custom-...

Swiss air rescue company Rega, presented an innovative new addition to its search and rescue (SAR) fleet during its Annual Media Conference 2019: the newly developed Rega...

As of January 2019, DRF Luftrettung has become the shareholder for Northern Helicopter (NHC) – taking over all shares in the air rescue company.

Airbus Helicopters’ has opened a H135 final assembly line (FAL) in Qingdao, China – which not only marks the first helicopter FAL built by a foreign manufacturer in China...