Drones deployed to support Hurricane Irma response

Starting in Saint Maarten, relief organisation GlobalMedic has partnered with Aeryon Labs to provide aerial intelligence to first responders and international disaster relief teams on the ground, the drone manufacturer has announced. Aeryon said it has deployed a SkyRanger unmanned air system (UAS) and a pilot to help support the disaster recovery efforts in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma.

“GlobalMedic immediately offered our support to the communities affected by Irma,” said Rahul Singh, executive director, Global Medic. “Using UAS for aerial intelligence and reconnaissance enables us to rapidly determine how and where to help the people who need it the most.”

The drones deployed to the Caribbean are equipped with thermal cameras to help locate survivors by detecting body heat, said Aeryon.

In addition to search and rescue work, GlobalMedic will use SkyRangers to create detailed 2D and 3D maps of the affected areas, so that first responders can prioritise resources and co-ordinate the most effective response, Aeryon said. In areas where the majority of the buildings have been destroyed, these maps will also provide valuable information that will aid in the rebuilding efforts.

Other news

London's Air Ambulance (LAA) has received a case of HEMS-Star® portable helipad lights, which will help LAA dramatically particularly during winter when there are fewer...

US-based helicopter air ambulance operator Life Link III has announced the launch of OneLink™, a mobile app that allows hospitals and first responders to request air...

Babcock Scandinavian AirAmbulance (BSAA) has launched the first AW169 helicopter in active Emergency Medical Service (EMS) duty in the Nordics

The European partner of the International Helicopter Safety Team has updated and released a comprehensive 168-page guide for helicopter flight instructors based on...

Swiss air rescue provider Rega has been granted permission by the Federal Office of Aviation to use key intersections of the so-called Low Flight Network around the clock...